Photo Editing on Android [Built-In Editor]

A while ago I talked about this course coming up on "Android Photography" and what you could learn about using your device.  Well, there was some interest in people learning what we could use AFTER we took the photo.

Today I wanted to share with you some of the options.  Maybe that teacher might want to spy in on this article for some tips.  :)

There's PLENTY of apps out there for you to do some editing of your photos.  Not everybody is going to find 'their winner'.  Some people love GIMP, some are Photoshop ONLY.  To that end I'm going to talk about just 4 ... 5 options for you to look over.


These are the ones I've used the most, but let me know if there's ones you prefer in the comments.

This will cover part 1 - the built in editor.  After part 5 I'll do a 'comparison' article.
So, yeah, we take a lot of photos with our cameras.  A long time ago I had asked you in our weekly polls if your phone had replaced your digital camera as the main camera.  And except for a few shutter bugs out there, it had.

That means we're taking more photos and wanting to get the best out of it - and not always is our photo the best shot, so we need to... as they say in the photo biz... massage some pixels.

So, here's the first option.

Built-In Editor
First up - the built in editor.  I believe this is available on ANY device that's 4.0+.  Turns out this is actually a little more powerful that I first gave it credit for.

(now, some other versions of Android may or may not have all of these features - I'm running 4.2.2 stock - whereas if you're on 4.0.4 on TouchWiz you may have different features)

There's some of the standard 'filters' we can use to make our photo instantly appear like it was taken with some weird film and also apply frames to our photos of a variety.

Then we have some of the 'corrections'.  What I really like, and probably most use it for is straightening photos.  It's a very simple interface for that.  Just slide your finger left and right to adjust.


Then we have a bunch of adjustment filters.  Some useful, some not so.  Depends on your level of adjustment/editing you want to do.


Pretty good stuff, and it's no 'simple' lightweight features when you look at stuff like curves etc... it can handle it's own.

Best of all - there's no installing ANYTHING.  Just go.

So, in the next few articles I'll cover Aviary, Snapseed and Photoshop (Touch and Express), then I'll do a full comparison.
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